How safe is the water?

Read Cecchini’s article on PFOA and local drinking water at NorthJersey.com. PHOTO COURTESY OF NORTH JERSEY DISTRICT WATER SUPPLY COMMISSION

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Dr. Nina’s What You Need To Know About Public Restroom Sanitation

Remember the diaper-wearing astronaut that drove hours to confront her lover? The story got me wondering, not about the sordid love triangle, but about her diaper. As we know, the job requirements of an astronaut can preclude them from taking a bathroom break. To deal with this conundrum, they wear Maximum Absorption Garments, or adult diapers, under their space suits. And while the media proposed that she utilized diapers to cut down on travel time, I wonder if she suffered from “lutropublicaphobia,” the fear of public restrooms (no, I did not make that up). While few actually have the phobia, most of us have a healthy concern about the germs lurking in every nook and cranny of a public bathroom. To that extent, let’s take a look at how we can maintain hygiene in a public restroom.

Dr. Nina’s What You Need To Know: About Public Restroom Sanitation:

What types of germs are lurking? The list is loooooooong and ranges from E. coli to salmonella to hepatitis A to the potentially deadly, antibiotic resistant MRSA.

What is the dirtiest surface? Surprise! It is not the toilet seat, but the floor that contains the largest concentration of germs. One study showed that when the bottom of women’s purses was swabbed to detect bacteria, one-third of them demonstrated evidence of fecal (poop) bacteria! Other danger areas with a high concentration of bacteria include the outside of the sanitary napkin disposal, sink, and faucet.

Are all public restrooms created equal? No. In general, hospitals have the cleanest thrones because of the strength of disinfectants they use. On the other end of the spectrum are airport and airplane restrooms; they are considered the dirtiest. Airplane restrooms are tiny, thereby making it difficult for people to properly wash their hands or even want to wash their hands in the first place.

Eenie, meenie, minie, mo. Which stall to choose? Middle stalls are generally the dirtiest because people tend to choose them the most; it appears we like company on both sides. When possible, choose the first stall.

Toilet seats Before flushing, lower the toilet seat (preferably with toilet tissue as a barrier). The reason being: toilets can spray fecal-infected water into the air. What do we do if there is no lid? Flush and run.

What is the most effective thing I can do to prevent an infection? Wash our 2 hands and 10 fingers of mass infection. Rinsing with water followed by a 20 second soap scrub is the best defense against those treacherous germs. It’s a small price to pay to avoid eye, respiratory, and urinary infections, skin irritation, and digestive problems. To ensure we scrub for the necessary 20 seconds, sing “happy birthday” twice while getting every nook and cranny, front and back. Sounds easy enough? Unfortunately, only 77 percent of men and women attempt to wash their hands in public restrooms.

Should I use soap or hand sanitizer? Soap and water is the BEST way to reduce the number of germs, especially when they are visibly dirty or greasy. This is because the friction from rubbing our hands together helps dislodge germs. If soap and water are not available, then use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Sanitizers with higher alcohol concentrations are more effective at killing germs than those with lower concentrations and non-alcohol based ones. Make sure to utilize a large enough volume of sanitizer and allow it to dry; do not wipe it off.

Avoid re-contaminating After completing our business, we reach for one of the dirtiest surfaces—the sink faucet. Not a problem since we will be washing our hands, right? Wrong! Because we make contact with the faucet again to shut off the flow of water after washing, we can re-contaminate our hands. Automatic faucets obviate this problem. However, when they are not available, use a paper towel as a barrier.

Drying our hands Bacteria thrive in wet environments. Therefore, drying our hands is crucial. Paper towels and high-speed hand dryers have been shown to dry our paws equally well. However, high-speed hand dryers produce less mess, produce 42 percent less carbon dioxide, and are cheaper than paper towels. Only dilemma…how to shut off faucets and open the door to exit.

Let’s put the dilemma of public restrooms in perspective. Although they can be cringe-worthy, the possible infections from the dreaded stall are no different from the ones we can get anywhere else in public, including shaking hands. Additionally, germs are everywhere and we cannot live in a bubble, wear adult diapers, or gloves when out and about. However, we can follow proven techniques, in particular, washing our hands properly, to decrease our chances of becoming infected.

For more news on Dr. Radcliff:

Like her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrNinaRadcliff
Follow her on Twitter: @DrNinaRadcliff
Visit her official site, http://www.ninaradcliffmd.com

imageNotice: This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither Dr. Nina Radcliff or Kimberly Cecchini take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.
Before engaging in any complementary medical technique, including the use of natural or herbal remedies, you should be aware that many of these techniques have not been evaluated in scientific studies. Use of these remedies in connection with over the counter or prescription medications can cause severe adverse reactions. Often, only limited information is available about their safety and effectiveness.

Dr. Nina’s What You Need To Know About Some Not-So-Healthy ‘Health’ Foods

The best advertising campaigns are ones that go unnoticed.  They become so ingrained in society that they slip right under our nose and create a mainstream movement. As a result it requires us to investigate and dissect out what is what. In others words: to become knowledgeable.

Dr. Nina’s What You Need to Know: About Some Not-So-Healthy “Health” Foods

  • Fat-free foods. Let’s face it, the label is appealing. After all, who wants something filled with fat? But before you choose that fat-free option, consider this: Removing fat from foods often leaves them pretty tasteless, literally. To return the taste and make it edible, manufacturers may add sugar or salt. Sugar is converted into fat and can be stored in our bodies like other fats until it is burned off as energy. And we know that salt is responsible for 1 in every 10 deaths in the United States. Make sure to check the nutrition labels and consider all aspects of nutrition: calories, sodium, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.
  • Energy bars. Cleverly named, we have come to accept them as healthy meals that give us a boost, while on the move. However, some energy bars are full of high fructose corn syrup, added sugar, saturated fats, and very little fiber. Again, look at the nutrition label to determine the best choice for you. And opt for bars whose protein comes from soy, milk, whey or egg as opposed to collagen or gelatin, and fat calories less than 30 percent of the total calories.
  • Breakfast cereals. We would never condone having our children eat ice cream or cookies for breakfast. But did you know that a bowl of kid’s cereal has MORE sugar than ice cream by weight and is equal to 3 chips Ahoy cookies? We are literally and figuratively feeding our children sugar laden dessrt. Fortunately, there are healthy breakfast cereal choices on the market. Make sure to look at the labels and opt for choices that have less than 5 grams of added sugar per bowl.
  • Energy drinks. A young high school athlete recently died from a cardiac arrest while vacationing in Mexico because she drank too many cans of an energy drink. While the labels claim to boost energy, endurance, and performance, these drinks are loaded with mega-doses of caffeine which can increase our heart rate, blood pressure, and stimulate our central nervous system. Additionally, these drinks have been shown to increase the occurrence of headaches and migraines, insomnia, diabetes, risky behavior, nervousness, and vomiting. They can also be addicting.
  • Flavored yogurts. Yogurts are touted as a healthy food. But be careful when it comes to flavored yogurts which can contain up to 15 grams of sugar in those tiny cups! Many times there is no fruit and the flavor comes from sugars, artificial fruit flavors, or pureed fruit that is loaded with sugar. A great alternative is to choose plain yogurt and add fresh fruit.
  • Frozen yogurt. I have read that frozen yogurt is not an alternative to low fat yogurt, but an alternative to ice cream. The definition of yogurt is that it needs to be curdled milk and cultures. However, some frozen yogurts include multiple hard to pronounce additives: guar gum, maltodextrin, sodium citrate, cellulose gum, disodium phosphate, and propylene glycol monoesters. In fact, propylene glycol is used to dissolve medications into a water solution (e.g., propofol, an anesthetic agent). While it may be a healthier dessert than ice cream, make sure to keep serving sizes small and minimize unhealthy toppings.

Marketing gimmicks are clever. And the burden falls on us to wade through the waters especially when it can become a little murky. The Surgeon General states that “People are empowered when they have the knowledge, ability, resources, and motivation to identify and make healthy choices. When people are empowered, they are able to take an active role in improving their health, support their families and friends in making healthy choices, and lead community change.” Let’s live wise, healthy and empowered!

For more news on Dr. Radcliff:

Like her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrNinaRadcliff
Follow her on Twitter: @DrNinaRadcliff
Visit her official site, http://www.ninaradcliffmd.com

imageNotice: This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither Dr. Nina Radcliff or Kimberly Cecchini take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.
Before engaging in any complementary medical technique, including the use of natural or herbal remedies, you should be aware that many of these techniques have not been evaluated in scientific studies. Use of these remedies in connection with over the counter or prescription medications can cause severe adverse reactions. Often, only limited information is available about their safety and effectiveness.

Dr. Nina’s What You Need To Know About Drinking Water

H2Ohhhhhhhhh

We have all heard the saying that “The best things in life are free.” There is no doubt that hugs, smiles, kisses, and laughter are priceless. Well, let’s add another one to the list: drinking water. Did you know that water makes up 60% of our body weight and is present in every organ, tissue, and cell? We are swimming in it, both literally and figuratively. Water is also essential to a number of vital bodily functions: digestion, blood circulation, and temperature regulation. And because we lose fluids from evaporation, sweating, breathing (17,280 breaths/day), fat-burning, or going to the bathroom, we need to replace these losses by drinking water.

Water is necessary to maintaining life’s basic functions. Despite this, water is second to one: soft drinks. Here are some “free” fun facts on how drinking water can keep us healthy, one of the “best things in life.” Maybe we can even make it our number one, go-to beverage.

Dr. Nina’s What You Need to Know about the benefits of drinking water:

  1. Calorie comptroller. It’s a no brainer that choosing water over a calorie-containing beverage equals fewer calories consumed. So the next time we want to reach for an alcoholic drink or soda, consider opting for some “good ‘ol fashion” H2O. Additionally, water can fill up the tummy and decrease the number of calories that are consumed. Drinking just 2 cups of water before a meal, results in eating 75-90 fewer calories, on average, during the meal. Opting for a “fill-er-up” with water may curb our appetite for that second helping of fries.
  2. Muscle power. We see Popeye reaching for spinach to pump up his muscles. Hopefully he is washing it down with plenty of water. When muscles do not have enough water, they shrivel up and are unable to reach their full potential. Consider drinking fluids 2 hours before exercising and during a sweat session in order to boost muscle function. Not to mention, proper hydration has been shown to decrease muscle and joint soreness due to exercise.
  3. The fountain of youth. Unfortunately as we get older, our fountain of youth’s water level gets lower and lower. Although drinking water cannot erase wrinkles, it may be able to put a speed bump in the way of this process to slow it down.
  4. Kidney function. These hard working organs are so important that we have two of them. Our kidneys “flush” out toxins and waste products to keep us balanced and healthy. Adequate hydration is crucial for our kidneys to function properly. Additionally, not drinking enough water is often the culprit behind those pesky (and very painful) kidney stones.
  5. Keep it moving. Constipation—for a lack of better words—is a party pooper. One of the most effective treatments is to increase water intake. When dehydrated, our body will do everything it can to conserve water. This includes “pulling” or “absorbing” water from stool before it passes out of our digestive tract. The stool becomes hard and its transit time slows down.
  6. Burn calories and melt away fat without breaking a sweat. Like a furnace, our body requires energy—in this case, calories—to produce heat. Drinking cold water burns fat in men and carbohydrates in women in order to bring the fluid to normal body temperature.

The age-old question is how much is enough? Despite the recommendation that we should drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day, it really depends on our weight, level of activity, diet, and surrounding temperature. And the good news is that there is a simple way to figure it out. When we consume enough water, our urine is usually pale yellow.

Remember, the best things in life are free. And it is important never to lose sight of that. Especially since “the second best are very expensive;” these are wise words from the one and only Coco Chanel.

 

 

For more news on Dr. Radcliff:

Like her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrNinaRadcliff
Follow her on Twitter: @DrNinaRadcliff
Visit her official site, http://www.ninaradcliffmd.com

imageNotice: This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither Dr. Nina Radcliff or Kimberly Cecchini take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.
Before engaging in any complementary medical technique, including the use of natural or herbal remedies, you should be aware that many of these techniques have not been evaluated in scientific studies. Use of these remedies in connection with over the counter or prescription medications can cause severe adverse reactions. Often, only limited information is available about their safety and effectiveness.

Dr. Nina’s What You Need To Know About Sleep and Weight Gain

Our Loss, Our Gain: Sleep and Weight How They are Linked

Feeling sleepy this morning and constantly reaching for more coffee and a doughnut to wash it down? Those potato chips also seem to be calling our name louder than we remember. We just want that salt. And why not? We could use that extra boost of energy. And the gym workout is out of the question because we have a headache. Tonight’s menu will be takeout because we do not feel like cooking.

It’s no surprise that just one night of sleep deprivation can result in an extra 600-1000 extra calories consumed in just one day. In fact, losing just a few hours of sleep a few nights in a row caused people to pack on an average of about two pounds. Sleep has an effect on our appetite, physical activity, metabolism, and cues that tell us we are full. And a lack of it is enemy number one to our waistlines.

Dr. Nina’s What You Need To Know: About the Link Between Sleep Deprivation and Weight Gain

Some Statistics

  • People who averaged 6 hours of sleep per night were 27 percent more likely to be overweight than those who averaged 7-9 hours. People averaging just 5 hours of sleep per night were 73 percent more likely to be overweight.
  • High quality sleep is associated with lower body fat while poor sleep correlated with higher body fat
  • Waking and going to sleep at the same time every day (particularly a consistent wake time) was most strongly linked with lower body fat
  • When enrolled in a weight loss program, getting an adequate amount of good quality sleep increased the chance of weight loss success by 33 percent.

Blame it On The…Hormones

We have hormones in our body that signal when the body is full and when the body is hungry. Ghrelin (sounds like “gremlin” without the “m”) makes our bodies want to eat; whereas, leptin tells our bodies that we are full. They act in a see-saw fashion and counterbalance each other.

A lack of sleep warps the way these hormones are released: More ghrelin, less leptin. This can significantly increase our appetite for high-calorie and high-fat foods.  And if that wasn’t enough, we also experience a reduction in our rational decision-making abilities. A sleepy brain appears to not only respond more strongly to junk food, but also has less ability to rein that impulse in.

The Sleep Diet  

Losing weight while we are sleeping and not even needing to break out a sweat? That is worthy of a Nobel Prize. Someone weighing 150 pounds will burn 95 calories per hour while quietly sleeping. Although we are resting, our body continues to work and use up calories to sustain vital functions; for example, it is maintaining our body’s temperature, repairing cells, digesting food, and pumping blood.

And we burn the most calories while in deep sleep such as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. This is because our brain is highly active; sometimes more active than when we are awake. Calories provide the fuel or energy, and we need lots of it to fuel our thoughts. That’s a scary thought and maybe we should all get back in bed to ponder it.

Metabolism

Changing food into a form that can be used by our bodies is called metabolism.  And because sleep loss can cause insulin resistance, it can decrease our metabolism. Insulin is a hormone that functions as a “key” to allow entry of glucose into cells and change it into energy to fuel work. When cells become insulin resistant, they are unable to use the hormone efficiently and metabolism is decreased.

Getting your ZZZ’s is one of the best prescriptions to keep the weight off and can even help us lose it. That’s food for thought: A diet plan that makes losing weight as easy as losing our cell phones or keys. It’s time to tame that little gremlin…I mean ghrelin. So let’s commit to sleeping more and getting RID of that weight.  After all, losing it may mean you will find it again.

For more news on Dr. Radcliff:

Like her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrNinaRadcliff
Follow her on Twitter: @DrNinaRadcliff
Visit her official site, http://www.ninaradcliffmd.com

imageNotice: This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither Dr. Nina Radcliff or Kimberly Cecchini take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.
Before engaging in any complementary medical technique, including the use of natural or herbal remedies, you should be aware that many of these techniques have not been evaluated in scientific studies. Use of these remedies in connection with over the counter or prescription medications can cause severe adverse reactions. Often, only limited information is available about their safety and effectiveness.

Dr. Nina’s What You Need To Know About Yawning

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that NOT all yawns are created equal, that although they are endowed by Mother Nature with certain unalienable causes, that among these are Sleepiness, Excitement, and the Pursuit of Empathy…we still do not know exactly why we do it.” Reading this improvised Declaration of Yawning probably did little to unlock the mysteries surrounding this phenomenon, but ten bucks says you yawned while reading it! Let’s look at some fun facts about yawning!

What are some possible explanations for why we do this?   The next time you yawn during a meeting or while the teacher is giving a lesson in the classroom, realize that your body is probably trying to stretch out its lungs or become more alert. Our breathing tends to be shallow when we are tired, sleepy, bored, or just waking up. The deep breath that accompanies a yawn can fill up your lungs and prevent tiny airways from collapsing. Additionally, moving your ligaments and muscles may also make you feel more awake.

On the other end of the spectrum, yawning also occurs in response to stressful situations. The next time you see athletes or live entertainers before a game or performance, pay close attention. Similar to deep breathing techniques, yawning can increase blood flow to the brain and help prepare for increased activity or focus.

Seeing someone laugh, often makes you laugh. Seeing someone cry can bring tears to your own eyes. Similarly, yawning is contagious. It is believed to reflect empathy and social bonding. In fact, contagious yawning is more likely when you are close to someone—family or friends—as compared to strangers. Although simple and reflexive, yawning is suggestive that you are seeing things from another person’s point of view and are responding to that person’s emotions. Additionally, yawning is also believed to diffuse stress after a period of being on high alert and spread a feeling of calm through a group.

When do we do it the most? In general, we tend to yawn approximately 10 times per hour. This number may increase in the morning and at night. With the temperatures dropping, brace yourself for an increase in the number of yawns you dish out. This may be because yawning also serves to cool the brain. Like a radiator, the warm blood is removed from the brain when cooler blood from the lungs is introduced.

At what age do we start yawning? Yawning begins even before you are born! As early as 11 weeks after conception, fetuses begin yawning. However, contagious yawning typically does not begin until 4 years of age.

Are humans the only ones in the animal kingdom that yawn? Nope! As those of you with pets probably know, yawning is not unique to humans. In fact, spontaneous yawning occurs in all vertebrates, including fish, snakes, and lizards. Contagious yawning, which is believed to reflect empathy and social bonding, however, is limited to dogs and chimpanzees. So the next time you yawn in front of your pet dog or chimpanzee, see if they reciprocate.

Are there any conditions to worry about? Contagious yawning is reflective of empathy and social bonding. Therefore, it is not surprising that people with schizophrenia and autism, conditions with impaired emotional development, yawn less. In fact, the more severe autism is, the less frequently the person yawns. On the other hand, excessive yawning may be seen in people with multiple sclerosis, Lou Gehrig’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and following radiation therapy. The reasons for this are not clear. That said, don’t go running to the doctor if you’ve been yawning a lot—you might just be tired!

How many times do you think you yawned while reading this? I know, I yawned a lot while writing it! Just thinking about it is enough to trigger your brain to dish one out. The next time you yawn around others see for yourself how contagious it is. Just make sure to cover your mouth to avoid inhaling flies!

For more news on Dr. Radcliff:

Like her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrNinaRadcliff
Follow her on Twitter: @DrNinaRadcliff
Visit her official site, http://www.ninaradcliffmd.com

imageNotice: This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither Dr. Nina Radcliff or Kimberly Cecchini take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.
Before engaging in any complementary medical technique, including the use of natural or herbal remedies, you should be aware that many of these techniques have not been evaluated in scientific studies. Use of these remedies in connection with over the counter or prescription medications can cause severe adverse reactions. Often, only limited information is available about their safety and effectiveness.

Dr. Nina’s What You Need To Know About Home Remedies for Sleep

Don’t Get Stuck Between a Rock and a Hard Place

“At night I cannot fall asleep or stay asleep. But in the morning, I cannot wake up or stay awake.” If this describes your sleep pattern, you are not alone. Nearly 70 million Americans suffer from insomnia. And now there is mounting evidence that sleep deprivation causes more than just grouchiness, headaches, and difficulty concentrating. Studies have shown that chronic insomnia can increase our chances of heart disease, diabetes, dementia, and possibly even cancer.

Although we are desperate to get a good night’s sleep, many of us do not want to “pop a pill.” This leaves us feeling as though we are stuck between a rock and a hard place. The good news is that there are a number alternative methods that may work for you.

Dr. Nina’s What You Need to Know: Home Remedies that May Help You Get Your ZZZ’s:

Aromatherapy Although not a cure, stimulating our olfactory senses can possibly help us fall asleep more quickly and stay asleep longer. Part of the process of drifting off to la la land is calming ourselves and slowing our activities through bedtime routines and rituals. The fancy schmancy term for this is “sleep hygiene.” One possible way to “clean up” our sleep routine is to place a few drops of lavender, sweet marjoram, chamomile, sage, or jasmine essential oils on your pillow at bedtime. These scents are believed to evoke calming, soothing, relaxing, and warming feelings.

Melatonin “Tick tock, tick tock, tick tock, tick tock. Oh dear, oh my, I really hate mice.”  Correction…I really hate not being able to fall asleep. When we hear people speaking about their internal clock, they are referring to melatonin. This naturally produced hormone coordinates our body’s physiological rhythms that help set the brain’s biological clock. Light inhibits its secretion from the pineal gland whereas darkness has the opposite effect and signals for increased melatonin secretion. That is why it is sometimes referred to as the “Dracula of hormones.” Normally, melatonin levels start increasing in the mid-to late evening, remain elevated throughout the night, and then taper off in the early morning hours. As we get older, our melatonin production decreases and can contribute to insomnia. If you are suffering from insomnia and want to avoid anything addictive, taking an over-the-counter supplement at bedtime may help you get your ZZZ’s.

Chamomile tea Among all non-prescription sleep aids, chamomile is one of the most popular. It is believed that this tea contains a chemical that provides anti-anxiety effects. However, not everyone is convinced that this is a magic bullet for insomniacs. Some believe that whatever sleepy effect it has is due to either being a warm liquid or having a placebo effect (we think it relaxes us, so it does!). But when counting sheep is not cutting it, this may be a safe, non-addictive alternative.

Valerian There has been a lot of recent buzz about this natural herb’s potential to help us fall asleep. It is believed to increase GABA levels—a neurotransmitter in your brain that has a calming and anti-anxiety effect. As a result, valerian appears to increase deep sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. But before you decide to pop a pill of Valerian root, speak with your doctor and pharmacist for possible interactions with your prescription drugs. Herbal supplements may have unwanted interactions with your medications.

Turning to home remedies may force us to find better ways to sharpen our math skills. Afterall, when we have difficulty sleeping, we often find ourselves calculating how much sleep we will get if we could just “fall asleep right now.” In addition to these remedies, try to “turn down the noise” by creating a sleep hygiene plan that works for you, and your health. Sweet dreams. Dulces suenos.

For more news on Dr. Radcliff:

Like her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrNinaRadcliff
Follow her on Twitter: @DrNinaRadcliff
Visit her official site, http://www.ninaradcliffmd.com

imageNotice: This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither Dr. Nina Radcliff or Kimberly Cecchini take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.
Before engaging in any complementary medical technique, including the use of natural or herbal remedies, you should be aware that many of these techniques have not been evaluated in scientific studies. Use of these remedies in connection with over the counter or prescription medications can cause severe adverse reactions. Often, only limited information is available about their safety and effectiveness.